Rest in Peace: Catherine Ford, 1934, Memorial

Rest in Peace Beautiful Baby

Name: Catherine Ford
Birth Date: 12 Dec 1934
Birth Place: Birmingham, Alabama
Death Date: 12 Dec 1934
Death Place: Birmingham, Jefferson, Alabama
Burial Date: 14 Dec 1934
Cemetery Name: County Farm
Death Age: 0
Occupation: Infant
Race: Black
Marital Status: Single
Gender: Female
Street address: 924 Short 17 St.
Father Name: James Pettis Ford
Father Birth Place: Alabama
Mother Name: Addie Curtis
Mother Birth Place: Alabama
FHL Film Number: 1908525

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Original data:”Alabama Deaths and Burials, 1881–1952.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.

Name: Catherine Ford
Death Date: Dec 1934
Death County: Jefferson
Volume: 55
Roll: 3
Page #: 27223

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. Alabama Deaths, 1908-59 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Original data: State of Alabama. Index of Vital Records for Alabama: Deaths, 1908-1959. Montgomery, AL, USA: State of Alabama Center for Health Statistics, Record Services Division.

“Hug Him Once for Me” by Erica McClure. I wrote this song when our 5 1/2 month old son went to sleep for his nap on earth one day and woke up in Glory. A friend of mine who also lost a son, made the video for me. I pray it is a blessing to someone today. If you have any questions please go to www.greenroadbaptist.org

October 15, 2014 at 8:32 pm Leave a comment

1930 Census Addie Ford (Fort) Family, Birmingham Alabama

US Federal Census 1930, Birmingham, Alabama

 

Household Members:
Name Age
Addie Ford, b. 1885, servant private home 45
Douglas Ford, b. 1912, delivery boy, drug store 18
Wilbert Ford, b. 1919 11
Herman Ford, b. 1921 9
Pankie/Pinkie Ford, b. 1923 7
Jessie Griffith (Boarder), b. 1890, chaufeur, private family 40
Name: Addie Ford
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1885
Birthplace: Alabama
Race: Negro (Black)
[Black] 
Home in 1930: Birmingham, Jefferson, Alabama
Map of Home: 714 15th Way North
Marital Status: Widowed, Pettus Ford/Fort.
Relation to Head of House: Head
Parents’s Birthplace: Alabama – Both Mother and Father

Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Birmingham, Jefferson, Alabama; Roll: 28; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 0074; Image: 37.0; FHL microfilm: 2339763.

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

October 15, 2014 at 8:15 pm Leave a comment

1940 Census Addie Ford (Fort) Family, Birmingham Alabama

1940 US Federal Census, Birmingham, Alabama

treaschesst.1

Adelona “Addie” Ford Family. Previous records note the last name as “FORT”. Wilbun is a misspelling, the correct name should be Wilburt/Wilbert Ford/Fort.

Addie  Ford/Fort was married to Pettus Fort/Ford. Also known as:  James Pettus, Petus, and Pettis. Pettus Ford/Fort worked for Ames Transfer Company, so this is likely the connection to Wilbur’s employment. Other family members worked for Ames Bag Company, am wondering if this is related.

 

The Fort family originated in Harrell’s (Dallas County) then moved to Mitchell’s (Dallas County, outside of Selma), Mobile then Birmingham.

 

Children of Addie and Pettus Fort/Ford: Wilbur/Wilbert (1911), Douglas (1912)  Herman (1921), and Katherine (1919), Catherine (1934-1934). A child named Pinkie is also recorded in the census, I am wondering if this was a nickname for Katherine.

 

If you have any information about this family, please leave a comment below. Thanks!

 

Name: Addie Ford
Respondent: Yes
Age: 46
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1894
Gender: Female
Race: Negro (Black)
Birthplace: Alabama
Marital Status: Widowed
Relation to Head of House: Head
Home in 1940: Birmingham, Jefferson, Alabama
Map of Home in 1940: View Map
Street: 23rd Street So
House Number: 217
Farm: No
Inferred Residence in 1935: Birmingham, Jefferson, Alabama
Residence in 1935: Same Place
Resident on farm in 1935: No
Sheet Number: 3B
Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 88
House Owned or Rented: Rented
Value of Home or Monthly Rental if Rented: 7
Attended School or College: No
Highest Grade Completed: Elementary school, 3rd grade
Duration of Unemployment: 4
Weeks Worked in 1939: 50
Income: 300
Income Other Sources: Yes
Neighbors:
Household Members:
Name Age
Addie Ford 46
Wilbun/Wilbur Ford 29, b. 1911, Laborer, Transfer Co.
Katherine Ford 21, b. 1919, Married, Maid Private Family

 

 

 

 

Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Birmingham, Jefferson, Alabama; Roll: T627_93; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 68-111A.

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.

October 15, 2014 at 7:53 pm Leave a comment

UK: New Adoption Rules Make it Easier to Trace Family Tree, Get Educational Entitlements

United Kingdom, Sept 29, 2014: The government established new rules to help facilitate “contact between ‘persons with a prescribed relationship’ and the birth relatives of a person adopted before 30 December 2005″.

Descendants now able to discover more of their medical background even if adopted due to a new rules. Previously, ONLY the adoptee and their birth relatives were able to utilize specialized adoption agencies to help research family history and make contact other family members.

Under the new rules, “persons with a prescribed relationship’ as anyone related to an adopted person by blood (including half-blood), marriage or civil partnership or by virtue of the adoption. This will include all relatives of the adopted person, including but not limited to the children and grandchildren of adopted persons” can gain access to information about their ancestors’ lives, research family history, discover their medical background and contact other family members. The consent of the adopted party is required before making contact UNLESS a) the person is seeking information that does not reveal identifying info, b) the adopted person cannot be found to give consent or c) the adopted person dies or is unable to give consent. The information will be shared through a government-run intermediary agency.

Children and Families Minister Edward Timpson: “It’s right that descendants and other relatives of adopted adults are able to access important information, such as medical records or genetic health conditions, which could impact upon how they live their life today.

They should also be able to find out about important events from their past, as well as make contact with family members if they wish.

“This positive change will help thousands of people discover their place in history, while keeping important safeguards in place to protect the right to a private family life for those who were adopted.”

Julia Feast OBE, from the British Association for Fostering and Adoption (BAAF): “We are very pleased that the government has extended the rights of descendants and other relatives to access an intermediary service whilst ensuring that the adopted person’s rights are not overlooked and will be at the centre of the decision making.”

Other reforms include: 

Establishing a fund of £19.3 million fund to assist adopted children as they settle into their new families by offering support services  and offering extended educational entitlements for adopted children.

Also, the government has published the Adoption Passport which provides all the rights and entitlements of adoptive parents, alongside new online maps to help potential adoptive families to gain  information about services in their area.  First4Adoption is the government funded information service for people interested in adopting a child.

The new rules will take effect by November 2014.

I personally have to wonder how much information is being shared, and if this could lead to privacy violations or safety concerns? I personally would not like someone digging up my medical records and having access to that information–at any time. It would be scary to go into a website and dig up private information about your ancestor which could easily be shared or made public. And what happens for children conceived out of rape or whose family member experienced domestic violence, what safety precautions are taken then? 

And do you really want the government to be the gatekeeper to your family’s genealogy and personal information? What kind of database is the UK government creating on its population anyways?

We will just have to see how this plays out… because this article does not offer alot of info.

Source: Go.Uk Press Release, 9/25/2014, “Relatives of adopted adults now able to trace family tree”: http://www.familylawweek.co.uk/site.aspx?i=ed133086

October 14, 2014 at 6:37 am Leave a comment

WF Harrell – Harrell Family Alabama

There was a post asking about the Harell family that founded Harrell’s Crossroads or Harrell’s in Dallas County, Alabama. My response became lengthy so I am making it into a post.

The post office of Fort or the town of Fort was renamed Marion Junction. The Fort, Harrell, and Rasco families are closely related. “Harrell’s Crossroads” is west of Selma on highway US 80.

Gabriel Homes Harrell born 12 Aug 1778 in Bertie County, North Carolina and died 16 Oct 1829 in Dallas County, Alabama. Originally settled in Cahaba. Gabriel Holmes Harrell married Frances “Fanny” Harrell. Mrs. Fanny Harrell was born April 4, 1781 in Bertie County, North Carolina and died in 1839 in Dallas County, Alabama. 

1810 United States Federal Census 1810 United States Federal Census
Name: Gabriel Harrell
County: Bertie
State: North Carolina
Free White Males Under 10: 2
Free White Males 10 to 15: 2
Free White Males 26 to 44: 1
Free White Females Under 10: 1
Free White Females 10 to 15: 1
Free White Females 16 to 25: 1
Free White Females 26 to 44: 1
Numbers of Slaves: 16
Number of Household Members Under 16: 6
Number of Household Members Over 25: 2
Number of Household Members: 9

Source Citation: Year: 1810; Census Place: , Bertie, North Carolina; Roll
39; Page: 168; Family History Number: 0337912; Image: 00109.

Children of FANNY HARRELL and GABRIEL HARRELL are:

i. CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH6 HARRELL, b. March 26, 1804, Bertie Co., North Carolina; d. December 08, 1870, Marion Junction, Alabama; m. BURWELL JACKSON FORT I, April 24, 1824, Dallas County, Alabama; b. December 28, 1797; d. Unknown.
46. ii. ELIZABETH ANN HARRELL, d. Unknown.
iii. WHITMELL F. HARRELL, d. Unknown; m. PHERABY FORT RASCO; d. Unknown.
47. iv. HARDIMAN ISRAEL HARRELL, b. 1809  d. Unknown. m. NANCY PRINCE FORT (b. May 13, 1802)
v. JOSIAH HARRELL, b. Aft. 1798; d. Unknown; m. LOUISIANA BRANTLEY, 1851; d. Unknown.
vi. MARY ANN HARRELL, d. Unknown; m. PASCHALL B. TRAYLOR; d. Unknown.

FAMILY OF W.F. HARRELL of HARRELL’S ALABAMA

Name: Whitmell Finis/Francis Harrell

Birth: April 10, 1806

Parents: Gabriel Holmes and Frances “Fanny” Harrell

Place of Birth: Bertie County, North Carolina

Married: Pherby Fort Rascoe

Pherby was born April 19, 1808 in Trigg County, Kentucky.  Her parents were Laban T Rasco (KY) and Sarah Reese (NC). She died on June 7, 1882 in Blount County, Alabama. And was buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery Blount Co Ala. 

The Rasco were also originally from Bertie County but moved to Christian County Kentucky in the 1790’s and then to Dallas County in the early 1820’s.

Date of Marriage: 1829

Children: Amelia S., Harrell Moss and Whitmell Henry Harrell and Finis Ewrin Harrell

Death: May 10, 1877

Place of Death: Hayden, Blount County, Alabama

Buried At: Harrell Cemetery, Blount County, Alabama

***

1850 CENSUS:

Place: Cahawba, Dallas, Alabama

Family#: 570

<strong>W. F. Harrell, 44, b. 1806, M Farmer 11,800 NC</strong>
Ferreby 42, b. 1808, F,  KY
Henry, 17, b. 1833, M, Student, AL
F. W. 10, b. 1840, M “
A. S. 4, b. 1846, F “
Miss Julia Bland 20, b. 1830, F,  GA

608/608 <strong>G. H. Harrell 30M Farmer 5,300 AL</strong> (GABRIEL H. HARRELL)
E. J. 30, F, NC (ELIZA J. KING-HARRELL)
O. A. 10M AL (DR. OSCAR HARRELL)
C. L. 7M ” (CALVIN LUTHER HARRELL)
F. B. 6F “
M. W. 4, F ” (MATTIE, FLORIST)
G. H. 2M “
G. G. Smith 30M Physician GA

NOTE: Marriage: Harrell, Gabriel H. m Eliza J. King – 27 Mar 1838 pg 106

On November 29, 1850, W.F. Harrell bought one lot and parts of two others in Cahaba from William Gwin & Rosy Ann (Wilson) Gwin. The Gwins sold Lot #231 and 80 feet running N and S and on the eastern side of lots #217and 218 in the town of Cahaba, Dallas Co., AL, to Whitmiel F. Harrell for$1000.00. (From Dallas County Book N, pp.627-28)

 

Source: 1850 Census, Dallas County, AL: <a href=”http://www.gwingenealogy.net/GENEALOGY/ALABAMA/census1850dallcoMYnames.htm&#8221; title=”1850 Census Dallas County AL” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>http://www.gwingenealogy.net/GENEALOGY/ALABAMA/census1850dallcoMYnames.htm</a&gt;

Gwin Family Deed/and or Mortgage Transcriptions and/or Abstracts: http://www.gwingenealogy.net/GENEALOGY/DEEDS/DeedsEtc.htm

DALLAS CO, AL MARRIAGES — APPEARING IN MARRIAGE BOOK I: 1818 – 1845: http://www.genealogytoday.com/pub/ALMARR.HTM

1860 SLAVE CENSUS:

<strong>HARRELL, W. F., 99 slaves, Harrels, page 63</strong> (DALLAS COUNTY, ALABAMA.
LARGEST SLAVEHOLDERS FROM 1860 SLAVE CENSUS SCHEDULES and SURNAME MATCHES FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS ON 1870 CENSUS. Transcribed by Tom Blake, May 2001: <a href=”http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ajac/aldallas.htm&#8221; title=”LARGEST SLAVEHOLDERS FROM 1860 SLAVE CENSUS SCHEDULES” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ajac/aldallas.htm</a&gt;)

1860 CENSUS

Place: Harrells/Harrells Beat, Dallas, Alabama

W.F. Harrell- Value of his real estate is $53,000. value of personal estate is $102,350. Occupation is farmer.

Post Office is in Forts.

<strong>W F Harrell, Whitmill Finis/Whitmill Francis E. Harrell </strong> 53 – born. 1807, North Carolina
<strong>P F Harrell </strong> 51- born 1809, Kentucky
T E Harrell 19, b. 1841, M
A S Harrell 13, b. 1847, F
W H Harrell 27, b. 1833, M
S C Harrell 21, b. 1839, F
C L Harrell 4, b. 1856, F
W T Harrell 2, b. 1858, M
W A Harrell 10/12, b. 1859, M
G W Stewart 25, b. 1835, M

United States Civil War Confederate Applications for Presidential Pardons

Name: Whitmill F Harrell
Event Type: Amnesty
Event Date: 1865 – 1867
Event Place: Alabama

“United States Civil War Confederate Applications for Pardons, 1865-1867,” index, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V4M8-DLH : accessed 07 Oct 2014), Whitmill F Harrell, 1865 – 1867; citing “Case Files of Applications from Former Confederates for Presidential Pardons (‘Amnesty Papers’), 1865-1867,” Fold3.com; NARA microfilm publication M1003, roll 5

1870 CENSUS:

Sometimes after the War Between the States, Whitmel Finis Harrell moved his family to Shelby County Ala for his health and by 1870 he was living in Blount County. Whitmel was a very wealthy planter prior to the War Between the States. He was financially ruined by the War and it’s outcome. He lost his health as well.

I found a source indicating that W.F. Harrell owned a quarry, “The limestone is thus favorably situated for quarrying, and it has been worked on a considerable scale at Blount Springs and Bangor.
One quarry between these two places, belonging to W. F. Harrell, is now in operation. This quarry is an open working and the face is almost 80 feet high, extending nearly to the top of the outcrop on the escarpment. The following is a section of the rock quarried:

Section of Bangor limestone at Harrell quarry.
Feet.
Gray seraicrystalline limestone……………………………. 28
Dark sem(crystalline limestone…………………………… 12
Gray semicrystalline limestone……………………….’…… 40
The limestone beds are separated by thin partings of carbonaceous
shale.

Limestone from this quarry is used for flux in the furnaces at Birmingham and Bessemer.”

Source: “Limestone and Dolomite in the Birmingham District, Alabama” by Charles Butts.  (p. 247-248) http://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/0315g/report.pdf

Place: Township 13 Range 2, Blount, Alabama

Post Office: Blount Springs

Whitmill Harrell/Whitmill Finis E Harrell, Retired Farmer, Value of Personal Estate $250

Forabee Harrell, Keeping House

1880 CENSUS:

Place: Township 13 Range 2, Blount, Alabama

Post Office: Blount Springs

Rheraba F. Harrel/Pherby Fort Rasco Harrell, Widowed, Keeping House

Ada Moss, b. 1867, Granddaughter. Father born in AL, Mother born in MISS.

 

NOTES:

Genforum: My grandmother’s wedding took place near Birmingham, AL in 1918. T<strong>her wedding book is signed by several Harrells, including Grace, Mr. &amp; Mrs. W. H. Harrell and what appears to be Mr. &amp; Mrs. W.F. Harrell.</strong> My grandmother wrote next to one of the Harrell’s “2nd cousin”. Keeping in mind that the Harrells need not have lived in AL to attend the wedding, does anyone have any family connections that might fit?
http://genforum.genealogy.com/harrell/messages/1431.html<a href=”http://genforum.genealogy.com/harrell/messages/1431.html&#8221; title=”Harrell on Genforum” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”></a>

ORIGIN OF HARRELL SURNAME: Researchers have found the surname Harrell established along the Scottish-English border about 400 A.D. Many families lived as clannish groups, and they often engaged in feuds. In the early 1600s, some of these clans were sent to Scotland and Ireland. Some were sent to the Colonies. They settled along the eastern coast from Newfoundland to Virginia and the Carolinas. Source: “The Harell Family”http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/Spring99/Moulden/frame.htm

See also: Harrell Families of Early Hertford County, North Carolina: http://www.harrellfamilies.com/

Harrell, a Scottish-English surname, derived from Old French “hurer”, meaning to bristle, was a diminutive nickname for someone with lots of hair.

In Scottish Harrell family history, the family held a seat (feudal home) in Argylshire, and another Harrell family held an ancient seat in Northumberland on the English-Scottish border.

Harrell was established as a surname in England by Normans following the conquest in 1066; the earliest recorded use is in an abbey charter in 1154 where it is spelled “Horel”.

The surname Harrell also appears in Ireland where it may be an anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ó hEarghail ‘descendant of Earghal’. Earghal was a given name with the same etymology as Fearghal,which may be anglicized as Fergal but is also the source of the surname Farrell. Fearghal was a popular given name for boys meaning manly or valorous in early Ireland.

American Harrell genealogy dates to 1676 in Maryland.

 

SOURCES:

AL Dallas L Archives, “Re: [ALDALLAS-L] Finis Ewing Harrell Sr. & Wife” by James R. Rasco (Jrrasco@aol.com): http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/ALDALLAS/2001-08/0997659505

Descendants of John Harrell Sr., Generation 4 by Claude (Chip) Thomas Harrell, Jr.: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/a/r/Claude-T-Harrell-jr/GENE1-0004.html

Gabriel Holmes Harrell by Garland Lively, Rootsweb: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/HARRELL/2010-06/1276285019

Gabriel Holmes Harrell & wife Francis “Fanny” Harrell by James R. Rasco, Gen Forum: http://www.genforum.familytreemaker.com/harrell/messages/4324.html

Rascoe Family Tree, and Early Lineage by Tom Synder: http://tomesnyder.name/evanrees/Chapter7.pdf

Harrell Cemetery on Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GScid=23280

Whitmell Francis Harrell – Find A Grave, created by Nancy Alexander: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=94868604&ref=acom

Pherby F. Rasco Harrell – Find A Grave, created by Rose Ramos: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=HARR&GSfn=P&GSpartial=1&GSbyrel=all&GSst=3&GScntry=4&GSsr=1&GRid=40383860&

October 6, 2014 at 11:02 pm Leave a comment

Rest in Peace Eliott Fort – March 5, 1931 (Houston, TX)

Name: Elliott Fort
Birth Date: 13 Jul 1884
Birth Place: Alabama
Gender: Male
Race: Colored (Black)
Spouse: Mrs Minnie Fort
Father: Monk Fort
Mother: Julia Watkins
Age at Death: 46
Death Date: 5 Mar 1931
Death Place: Houston, Harris, Texas, USA

Resided in Houston 7 years

Occupation: Laborer, Hughes Tool Co.

Address: 712 Shepherd Street

Cause of Death: Natural

Undertaker:  Fairchild Undertaking Co

Place of Burial: Evergeen Negro Cemetery, Market Street between Calles Street, Lockwood Drive & Sakowitz Street

The cemetery, divided by Lockwood Drive into two sections, contains approximately 5.58 acres out of Lot 7, Middle Tier of the Harris & Wilson Survey, A-32, Harris County, Texas.

Children:

Bernice Fort b. 1908

Carrie Fort b. 1907

Grace Fort b. 1906

Percy Fort b. 1905

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. Texas, Death Certificates, 1903–1982 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.

Original data:Texas Department of State Health Services. Texas Death Certificates, 1903–1982. iArchives, Orem, Utah.

(Deette Dupree Nesbitt’s efforts to restore and save one of Houston’s oldest and most historic cemeteries, Evergreen which is located a few minutes away from downtown Houston, TX.)

 

Evergreen Negro Cemetery, Kay and Duane Douglass (Find A Grave #47176403)

 

Evergeen Negro Cemetery: Find A Grave

http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GRid=90898850&CRid=2299628&

The Evergreen Negro Cemetery is the third oldest African-American Cemetery in Houston. There are former slaves and World War I veterans buried in this cemetery.

Every gravemarker in the cemetery has been photographed and placed on Find-a-Grave.

Requests for photos of gravemarkers will be impossible to fulfilled as more than 95% of the graves do not have gravemarkers.

If your family member is listed here and does not have a gravemarker photograph, please check at Ancestry.com or at FamilySearch.org for a Texas Death Certificate. Regretfully, that will be the only source of proof for the individual’s burial.

In 1960, 490 individuals, more or less, were removed by the City of Houston to expand Lockwood Drive from Sonora to Library Road. Re-interments were in other sections of the cemetery as well as at Eternity Park Cemetery, Oak Park Cemetery and Paradise Cemetery. Johnson Funeral Home, located in Houston, Texas, was awarded the contract for the removal and re-burial of the bodies. There are no records existing regarding the remains and relocation as there were no cemetery lot/plot records and many of the graves were unmarked and/or unknown individuals. At the time of the removal, very few family members were located who could connect names with burial location.

Research has located approx. 4.500+ individuals buried in the cemetery, many of which, are in unmarked graves.

These burials were located through a search of Harris County Death Certificates.

However, it will be an impossible task to determine if an individual is actually buried in the cemetery or if they were relocated as many of the removed during the road expansion project were from unmarked / unknown graves and only a few hundred gravemarkers were placed in the cemetery.

Elliot Fort on Find A Grave: http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=fort&GSiman=1&GScid=2299628&GRid=90898850&

This makes me want to cry! Where is the respect for our deceased loved ones, and their families? You will be remembered and held up in prayer.

September 30, 2014 at 7:47 pm Leave a comment

Ames Bag Manufaturing Company Selma, AL

Here is some interesting history about the Ames Manufacturing Company (now closed) in Selma Alabama… written by Bobbie Ames:

“My husband inherited the old Ames Bag Manufacturing Company in Selma, Alabama, at the end of WWII. It was the largest manufacturing plant in the area, and had hundreds of employees who had worked there for many decades. It had awards for the efficiency of the operation and for the race relations, which were always remarkable in those years.This was not true of every business in those days.

The demand for cotton and burlap bags dwindled, and the company was forced to close or to make a transition to other products. Space does not permit me to expound on this remarkable story which has been related in corporate boards over the nation as an inspiration.

Just let me say this: Our Selma and Blackbelt employees unanimously wanted to learn new methods of manufacturing and they remained true to my husband’s business, as they learned new skills of making fiber and plastic containers of every kind imaginable. They made the first miniature Morton Salt and Accent cans for one example. The very first “Wet Ones” were designed in part by Jack Green, our on-sight ngineer. I never knew if he had his PE or not. He was a genius. These were fast changing skills for a work force that never finished college. They had the character to love learning new skills, and they shared Prayer and Scripture over the loud speaker. They had an open door any time day or night to the “Boss’s office.” We all shared moral absolutes and family values. I prayed with many individual mothers who worked there. There was no racial divide in that workforce.”

Source: “The Battle for the Minds of Children: American Education at the Crossroads” by Bobbie Ames, Alabama Gazette, 03/01/2014: http://www.alabamagazette.com/story/2014/03/01/education/the-battle-for-the-minds-of-children-american-education-at-the-crossroads/200.html

On September 20, 1979, A F2 tornado hit and that Ames Bag and Packaging Company sustained major damage when the roof and 3 walls of one of the buildings collapsed, causing $25,000 worth of damages. There were no fatalities, 2 people suffered minor injuries.: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/?n=tornadodb_1979

If you have anything to contribute, please post below in the comments–your resources, web links, stories and thoughts are appreciated!

NOTE: Just discovered my relative Ira Smith worked at the Ames Bag Manufaturing  Company in Selma.

Ira Smith (b.1891)  m. Alma J. Smith (b. 1897). According to the City Directory, Ira and Alma lived on 1538 Range Street in Selma.

 

August 4, 2014 at 10:53 pm Leave a comment

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