1880 Census: Dallas Co., AL with NC Origins

December 29, 2007 at 8:10 am 13 comments

It’s interesting to look at the origins of your ancestors. Many of the pioneer Martins who migrated to Dallas County, Alabama came from North Carolina. They were primarily planters, their farms became the hamlets for generations of African-American families, who worked the farms as slaves. Of those families are my own kin, the Martins.

I am interested in further documentation on this topic, here are a few facts I found online:

Extensive white settlement of Alabama followed the War of 1812 and the defeat of the Creek Nation. Most of the settlers came from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, pushed by land exhausted through the over-cultivation of cotton and drawn by the rich soil of the Tennessee Valley and the Black Belt. They brought with them slave labor and the plantation system, which were readily transplanted in Alabama. Steady demand for cotton made this product the nation’s leading export during the first half of the nineteenth century and solidified the planter elite’s sense of self-importance.”
A SHORT HISTORY OF ALABAMA AGRICULTURE, 1820-1945
by Dr. Dwayne Cox, University Archivist
http://www.lib.auburn.edu/archive/aghy/alag.htm

“In the Cotton belt, most slaves lived on plantations with less than 50 slaves. They worked in gangs, pressed on by an overseer, for the grueling year-long cycle of cultivation, which culminated in ginning and pressing the crop in January and February. The slave population almost tripled in size between 1790 and 1830. Most slave women had many children, beginning at age 19. Since children were most likely to be sold, this tragedy touched nearly every black family.” Africans in America, PBS: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part3/map3.html

The conditions in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia were favorable to an immediate expansion of cotton culture. There was a large, well-organized and mobile slave population which could promptly be transferred to new fields….
Many factors operated in favoring a rapid expansion of cotton culture. While cotton culture did not so rapidly exhaust a soil as did tobacco, the prevalent one crop culture without any crop rotation proved exhausting to the soils of the Coastal Plain and, to a less degree, of the Piedmont. Prices of cotton, on the whole, were falling and prices of slaves were rising.* Slavery, with its low economic efficiency, was therefore becoming unprofitable or less profitable in the older regions. The cheap and fertile lands to the westward were a strong inducement to the planter and especially his sons, who, as they set up in business, were lured westward. The Western Cotton Belt was the theater of the greatest expansion of slavery.” GEOGRAPHIC INFLUENCES IN AMERICAN SLAVERY BY F. V. EMERSON, University of Missouri
http://www.dinsdoc.com/emerson-1-2.htm

___________________________________

1880 Census: Summerfield, AL (Dallas County)

Emanuel Martin (b. 1835). farmer
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: Virginia

Spouse: Laura (1852)
children: Henry (12), Mary (9), George Ann (7), Mack (6), Nannie (4), Robert Lee (2)

Jordan Martin (b. 1835)
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: Virginia

Spouse: Jane “Judge” (b. 1850)
Children: Willie (12), Sarah Jane (9), James (7), Agnes (5)

NOTE: Jordan and Judge Martin are my kin. Their daughter, Sarah Jane, is the mother to my great-grandmother. I am wondering if Emanuel Martin is a relative to Jordan Martin.

Other children of Jordan and Jane Martin are: Wes(t) Martin, and Bama M. Martin (Dock)

Any information would be much appreciated on the family or lineage of Emanuel Martin 🙂

Rachel Martin (b. 1835)
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolina

Spouse: Bob Martin (b. 1825, Virginia, both parents from there). Farmer.
Children: Archie(18), Mary (14), Jimmie (11) , Bella (6)

PLEASANT HILL

Moses Martin (b. 1837, North Carolina). Farmer.
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolina

Spouse: Eliza (b. 1855, Alabama)
Children: Nimby (7), Frank (4), Samuel (2), Lucy (1)

Solomon Martin (b. 1810, North Carolina). Farmer.
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: Virginia

Spouse: Katie (b. 1835, South Carolina)
Children: Wilson (14)
Step-Children: William Moody (15), Susan Moody (13), Thomas Woody (11), Frank Woody (9), Loundes Woody (7), Eliza Woody (3 mos)

CAHABA

John Martin (1830, North Carolina). Farmer.
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolina

Spouse: Ann (b. 1840)
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolina

Eliza Martin (1842, North Carolina)
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolina

Spouse: Widowed, also from North Carolina
Children: Kattarrine Martin (14)

BURNSVILLE

Cherry Martin (b. 1780, North Carolina)
Spouse: Widowed
Occupation: Decrepit
Resides with: Alex (both parents from Georgia) and Violet (mother from AL) RADFORD
and children: Harriet (18), Martin (15), Sherman (14), Paul (10), Silas (10), Amy (8), Martha (6), Hettie (7), Sam (5), Julius (4), Sallie (3), Multum (3 mos)

PENCES

Richard Martin (b. 1827, North Carolina). Laborer.

Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolinna

Resides with: Charles Brown (born in Virginia, both parents from there) and Julia (both parents from Virginia)
and children: Stephen (13), Willie (11), Ella (9), Charles (7), Fannie (5)
and a William Petts (22), both parents from Alabama
Note: Henry Martin (b. 1797), a Summerfield farmer, is from North Carolina

BROWNS

John Martin (b. 1832, North Carolina). Farmer.
Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
Mother’s birthplace: North Carolina

Spouse: Charlotte (b. 1830 in Virginia, both parents from there)
Children: Thaddeus (14), Dink (12), Jacob (10)

_______________________
PRINCETON

Robert Martin (b. 1819, North Carolina). White. Both parents from North Carolina.
Spouse: Mary A.C. (b. 1826, North Carolina, both parents from there)
Children: John W. (22), Smith C. (18), Richard H. (15)
Something Other than a Direct Relationship: Robert A. Martin (9). Born in TN. Mother born in North Carolina, father born in Alabama.
Servant: Alfred Ransan (15). Alfred was born in Arkansas, both parents are from North Carolina.

SUMMERFIELD
Henry Martin (b. 1797, North Carolina). White. Both parents from North Carolina.
Spouse: Amanda (b. 1832, Kentucky, both parents from there)
Something Other Than A Direct Relationship: Prudence Morrow (47), Widowed. Born in North Carolina, both parents from there.

MARTINS
Atlas J. “AJ” Martin (b. 1821, North Carolina. White. Both parents from North Carolina.
Spouse: Harriet E. (b. 1825, Alabama)
Children: E. Bryant (26), Mary B. (17)

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Entry filed under: Historical Information & Tidbits, Martin. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , .

The Honey Web 1870: Alexander & Violet Radford Family

13 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Helen Love  |  January 8, 2008 at 10:41 pm

    Hello, I have your site and find it very interesting, the papragraph that you have pertaining to Cherry Martin, Alex and Violet Radford has really peaked my curiosity, you have a Paul and Silas age 10 years old in there, well I have been looking for anything that pertains to them for the last ten or fifteen years, they are my twin g-uncles,who are brothers to my ggrandmother Blanch, thier mother passed when Blanch was a very young child, and I am sure other family members took them in, things are not adding up, Blanch woul have been the age of the Hettie that you mentioned in your article. I am wondering and have been wondering for a while if Blanch may have changed her name from Hettie to Blanch. do you have any more information on the children that you named in this paragraph? there were 13 children but Martha’s twin Mary passed when she was born in 1856. please respond and thank you………………………….Helen

    Reply
  • 2. Helen Love  |  January 8, 2008 at 10:46 pm

    Helen again, I apologize, but I forgot to include Paul, Silas’ and Blanch’s last name, well as I know it , it is Coleman, mother is ? ,and for sure father is Henry Coleman.

    Reply
  • 3. In Our Hearts  |  January 9, 2008 at 8:38 am

    Dear Helen,

    I will keep you updated… Will try to do more research on your family line later this week. If someone took the kids in, it would most likely be a relative or neighbor. Looking to the families nearest to them on the census may be of help. Also, sometimes clues are passed down in the family that may seem unimportant but later are a goldmine. So I keep record of everything: NIcknames, Farms/Places Worked, Place Names, Personal Stories, etc.

    The head of this household is Alex Radford, his wife is Violet. Why do the kids have a different last name? Maybe “Hettie” is a nickname or middle name to Blanch? My grandfather is in the census with 2 different names because of similar reasons, and his last name is completely different from what he later went by. So have hope!

    This is how the 1880 Census Reads:

    Household:

    Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father’s Birthplace Mother’s Birthplace
    Alex RADFORD Self M Male B 59 AL Farmer GA GA
    Violet RADFORD Wife M Female B 40 AL Housekeeping — AL
    Harriet RADFORD Dau S Female B 18 AL Farm Laborer AL AL
    Martin RADFORD Son S Male B 15 AL Farm Laborer AL AL
    Sherman RADFORD Son S Male B 14 AL Disabled AL AL
    Paul RADFORD Son S Male B 10 AL Farm Laborer AL AL
    Silas RADFORD Son S Male B 10 AL Farm Laborer AL AL
    Amy RADFORD Dau S Female B 8 AL AL AL
    Martha RADFORD Dau S Female B 6 AL AL AL
    Hettie RADFORD Dau S Female B 7 AL AL AL
    Sam RADFORD Son S Male B 5 AL AL AL
    Julius RADFORD Son S Male B 4 AL AL AL
    Sallie RADFORD Dau S Female B 3 AL AL AL
    Multum RADFORD Son S Male B 3M AL AL AL
    Cherry MARTIN Other W Female B 100 NC Decrepid

    So Alex and Violet Radford are listed as the parents of all children listed including Paul, Silas and Hettie…

    I highly recommend Susette Cook for AL Death records. Her work is top notch with reasonable rates ($3 + SASE):
    http://alabamadeath.tripod.com/

    Blessings to you!

    Reply
  • 4. aisha hughes  |  May 1, 2008 at 4:30 am

    please is there any one from dallas county alabama that m,ay no any wiggins please contact ma. i am looking for my great grandmother. her name is anna wiggins born march 4 1894 died june 15 1966. she was married to a Mr. joe wiggins she had four children(it could be more) Brunner, Julius, and joe wiggins Roosevelt Sanders and Beatrice Wiggins-scott (beatrice is my Grandmother)

    Reply
  • 5. Flennory, Theresa  |  August 8, 2009 at 3:18 am

    My great great grand father was Jordon Flennory; born a slave about 1856. He has several children and worked as a sharecropper (AGRICULTURE) after slavery near Orrville, AL (Martin Station Crossroad or CAHABA, AL ). Any information on the Plantation who owned him would be appreciated.

    I believe that these families are my own kin, the Martins. (Jordan Martin b. 1835) and maybe Robert Bailey the founder was a relative too. There was a son Robert (Davis) who was mulatto and maybe the son of a Plantation owner.

    Any information about the Flennory family or first slave names..Henrietta or Clara, Jordan would be appreciated.

    My paternal grandmother was 1/2 white from a plantation owner and a female about about1974, her name was Henrietta. Her child was always called “May West.”

    She was a Flennory by marriage and had two children Percy and Lucille Flennoy, Flouney or sometimes spelled Fleury and even Flanery. She has a 1/2 sister named Lula Mae who was 1/2 black and 1/2 Creek (Native American).

    Other names that have come up are;
    Hewett,
    Pope,
    Poper,
    Bryman,
    Bailey,
    Benjamin
    and Williams.

    Most mid-wives could not spell well and often sound out the name with incorrect spelling.

    Reply
    • 6. In Our Hearts  |  August 20, 2009 at 6:14 pm

      My grandfather went by the name of Robert Davis, he was born in Dallas County in 1910. He also went by the last name of Martin and Ford.

      1880 Census: Summerfield, AL (Dallas County)

      Emanuel Martin (b. 1835). farmer
      Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
      Mother’s birthplace: Virginia

      Spouse: Laura (1852)
      children: Henry (12), Mary (9), George Ann (7), Mack (6), Nannie (4), Robert Lee (2)

      Jordan Martin (b. 1835)
      Father’s birthplace: North Carolina
      Mother’s birthplace: Virginia

      Spouse: Jane “Judge” (b. 1850)
      Children: Willie (12), Sarah Jane (9), James (7), Agnes (5)

      NOTE: Jordan and Judge Martin are the first set grandparents I have found, my family began with them. Their daughter, Sarah Jane, is the mother to my great-grandmother.

      Orrville and Dallas County is a small area, which family groups living close together, so your search shouldn’t be too hard.

      Keep me posted as you learn more 🙂

      Reply
  • 7. Flennory, Theresa  |  August 8, 2009 at 3:22 am

    Martin Station, Orrviille, Safford or Dallas County slave records between 1856-1865 would be helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
    • 8. In Our Hearts  |  August 20, 2009 at 6:11 pm

      To find slave records, you first have to locate a landowner and a location (state, town and county). There usually are multiple landowners in any given county or town–so try to be as specific as possible. Really pay attention to the stories passed down by your family, a little detail may go a long way.
      The actual records may not list the names of the slaves but they will list the landowner, value of property and number of slaves owned. They may also include a general description of the slave. Slaves were viewed as property so there is a big difference between what you would find in a slave record and a document from a later date–such as a census. You can really see in the way slave records were kept that these slaves weren’t thought of, and didn’t count much other than the labor they could provide–their lives weren’t worth recording.

      Your area may have a historical society to research these records in, some public libraries also have genealogical databases to research in.

      Blessings to you!

      Reply
  • 9. In Our Hearts  |  September 9, 2009 at 12:16 am

    I am having trouble finding Jordan Flennory… I found one death record in Jefferson County:
    Name: Jordon Flenory
    Death Date: Sep 1935
    Death County: Jefferson
    Volume: 40
    Roll: 3
    Page #: 19621

    You can get death records from Suzette Cook. I have worked with her and highly recommend her. http://alabamadeath.tripod.com/

    There are not too many Flennory’s in Mobile, so your search should not be hard.

    In the 1920 census, Percy Flennoryis listed with a spouse named Clara. Percy born 1894/1895 in Louisiana or AL and settled near Mobile. Percy worked in a saw mill and as a concrete laborer. I think they lived on Earl Street and also on Franklin Street.

    Percy’s mother is Mary West from Martin Station, AL.

    Other records list the DOB for Percy as 11/27/1899.

    Do you have any other family names??

    Reply
  • 10. Theresa Flennory  |  May 4, 2010 at 2:30 am

    Thanks for your research-Clara was my father’s first of 5 wives..LOL

    This infomation is correct for Jordon Flenory-sometime spelled Flennory , Flournary or Flenoy.

    Jefferson County:
    Name: Jordon Flenory
    Death Date: Sep 1935
    Death County: Jefferson
    Volume: 40
    Roll: 3
    Page #: 19621

    Reply
  • 11. Theresa Flennory  |  May 14, 2010 at 2:08 pm

    In the 1920 census, Percy Flennoryis listed with a spouse named Clara. Percy born 1894/1895 in Louisiana or AL and settled near Mobile. Percy worked in a saw mill and as a concrete laborer. I think they lived on Earl Street and also on Franklin Street.

    Percy’s mother is Mary West from Martin Station, AL.

    Reply
  • 12. In Our Hearts  |  July 21, 2011 at 4:29 am

    From Martins of Moore and Montgomery Counties, NC:

    Atlas Jones Martin (mother unknown) , b. December 22, 1820, North Carolina; d. May 25, 1908, Selma, Dallas County, Alabama.

    Married Harriot or Harriett Shields, daughter of John Shields of
    Moore Co., NC and Elizabeth Pauling of
    Orange, SC.

    http://www.ncgenweb.us/richmond/martinfam.htm

    Reply

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